Search
  • mackenzietalangton

Physical Development Pt.1 : Knapp time & lights on



Throughout the last several weeks new aesthetic themes and influences for my capstone project have emerged. Many of these influences come from the built environment, and the inherently ornamental nature of architecture and the construction of local historical buildings.

In this post I will share some of my recent discoveries and how I might infuse similar design details into the construction of my final collection.

One iconic shape or motif is the half circle which occurs in several architectural styles including Victorian, Edwardian, Renaissance even Art Moderne and Gothic Revival. This Shape no doubt is related to the Roman arch and employs the same engineering principles.



21 Rebecca Street, Hamilton, Ontario

This very same pattern is found in cabinet joinery from late 19th century Victorian furniture. Known as the "Knapp Joint" it was a simple and mass produceable construction method used in place of dovetails, which at the time was much more difficult to produce with a machine. Though this joint does not have the strength of the mighty dovetail it has a sinuous movement and graphic quality unlike that of the angular, rigid dovetail.




"Demilune Finger joint"

Ive synthesized this "demilune" or half moon shape into an undulating finger joint that, like the Knapp joint, serve as a suitable connection for planer surfaces such as the ballast blanket chest. This joint also has an ornamental graphic quality that is visually as well as tacitly intriguing.



Other applications I've explored for the use of this joint is in the wall mounting "hinge" for a cantilever lamp.



PUC electrical housing

This recent version of the reading lamp is a departure from the former "PUC floor lamp". This lamp is still designed to emulate a hydro pole or street light but embraces more contemporary, compact luxury lightning.




PUC Cantilever reading light

For this lamp I have outsourced a custom Copper lamp shade to be spun by a metal spinner in Toronto. The shape of this lamp shade (below) is intended to create a iconic silhouette of streetlights from the 1950's, the same my grandfather would have been installing during is time working as a linesman.






5 views0 comments

Recent Posts

See All